When Someone Carelessly Kills Your Loved One, You Can Fight Back

Losing a loved one in an accident involving carelessness is one of life’s worst tragedies. It’s so upsetting because it was a needless death. Your family member might have enjoyed many more years, if not for the negligent party’s disregard for the safety of others and for the sanctity of life.

So, what do you do when someone has caused you to love a beloved family member? You can fight back, by filing a wrongful death case. Wrongful death cases are difficult and complicated, so read on for more information on the process.

What is a Wrongful Death Lawsuit?

A wrongful death lawsuit is when you sue the party responsible for causing your loved one’s death. Not every person who causes another’s death will be held criminally responsible, so filing a wrongful death suit can allow you to receive some justice for your loved one.

Also, wrongful death suits award you a monetary payment, which is intended to compensate the family of the deceased for the suffering and monetary losses the death has caused them.

What Types of Damages are Common in Wrongful Death Cases?

There are several reasons that the family of a wrongful death victim will choose to file a wrongful death suit. One, the family may want justice for their loved one for what happened to them. Two, the family probably wants to keep the negligent party from hurting anyone else ever again. Three, they need compensation for financial losses.

When the court rules that the family has “won” the lawsuit, they will be awarded an amount in damages. You can be awarded compensation for the following damages in wrongful death cases:

  • Pain and suffering of the deceased prior to death
  • All related medical expenses
  • Funeral and burial costs
  • Grief and mental anguish
  • Loss of consortium
  • Loss of the deceased person’s income
  • Any other financial losses

Are You Considering Filing a Wrongful Death Claim in Chicago?

If your family member has been killed because of the negligence of another person, you should hold that person legally responsible. Sometimes winning a wrongful death case is the only way to receive justice for your family member. Working with a lawyer is usually a good idea, as these cases can be difficult to win on your own.

Calling a wrongful death attorney in Chicago can make it more likely that you will win your family the compensation they deserve.

Are Traffic Tickets Considered Criminal Offenses?

Traffic rules are meant to maintain order on the roads and keep the public safe. Enforcers keep a watchful eye on motorists and other road users. If any violates the rules, then they will be given a notice in the form of a traffic ticket. This could be a moving violation such as speeding or a non-moving violation such as parking in a restricted area.

The ticket looks different from state to state, but it will usually will contain the same information: the type of offense, the date and time it happened, the location of the incident, and the name of the issuing officer. So are traffic tickets considered criminal offenses?

What is a Criminal Offense?

Crime is a loaded word. People tend to have a lot of assumptions about it. The legal definition can be slightly different in various places, but it is generally considered as an unlawful act that is punishable through the state. However, not everything unlawful is automatically a criminal act. It must be so harmful that the public is put in danger because of it. Common examples are murder, theft, and rape. Another way to differentiate crimes from other unlawful acts is that it results in the restriction of liberty. In other words, it usually results in imprisonment of varying lengths.  

Severity of Traffic Violations

Most traffic tickets are given out for minor infractions. For example, someone who parked his car in a restricted area may have violated a rule and inconvenienced others, but the act did not really put anyone in harm’s way. As such, it is not considered a crime. The typical penalty would be a reasonable fine given the nature of the violation.

Not wearing a seatbelt while driving is another good example, as is having defective vehicle equipment. A motorist may also get a ticket for driving without a license, registration, or insurance. They often result in fines and license suspensions.

On the other hand, there are major traffic violations that merit greater attention and stiffer penalties. These include driving at a reckless pace that is way over the speed limit. This type of behavior is extremely dangerous. It disregards the safety of other road users and can very well lead of accidents if unpunished. It can be considered a criminal offense and could lead to jail time.

The same is true for drunk driving, if the motorist registers a BAC that is above the tolerable limit. Signs of heavy intoxication may also lead to a DUI charge, even if the blood alcohol level is below the limit.

If you are facing a traffic ticket, you can choose to pay the fine or fight it in court. Get the help of attorneys at Hersem Law for a higher chance of success.

 

LINKS:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traffic_ticket

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crime

Punishments for Cell Phone Tickets in NY

It is never a good idea to use a cell phone while driving.  Whether you are talking or texting, there are penalties. While safety is one concern, also consider punishments for cell phone tickets in NY.  

Adults and Cell Phone Tickets

Some people believe only teens and young adults engage in distracted driving, but adults often do it, too.  If this is your first offense, expect to pay between $50 and $200 in fines. In addition to the fine, expect a surcharge.  This can range up to $93.

Like most driving offenses, subsequent offenses will cost more.  If your second conviction occurs within 18 months, the fine can be up to $250.  A third offense can cost you up to $450.

Convictions will also result in driver violation points on your driver’s license.  

Young People and Cell Phone Tickets

A young person is not as experienced at driving as an older driver.  The penalties for cell phone use are more severe for individuals with learner’s permits and junior licenses.

Your first conviction will result in losing your permit or license for 120 days.  If your permit or license is eventually restored, and you receive a second conviction, it will be revoked for at least a year.

Lawyers in NYC

New York State is serious about cell phone use while driving.  Considering the traffic conditions and pedestrians, it can be much more serious in the city than in rural areas.  If you have made the mistake of using a cell phone while behind the wheel, get in touch with a traffic ticket lawyer in New York City as soon as you receive a ticket.

It can be difficult to manage your everyday life when you lose your driving privileges.  However, you should also consider the potential consequences of distracted driving due to cell phones.  When you text or talk, your driving does not have your undivided attention. You could cause an accident, hit pedestrians, or drive off the road.

If you are lucky, you have not caused any harm with distracted driving.  With help from a lawyer, you can start to make changes in your driving habits.  Your lawyer will take all the facts into consideration, so you can look forward to driving again.

Driving and Your Future

In New York City and throughout the state, call a traffic ticket lawyer immediately if you receive a ticket for using your cell phone.  You will know your rights and your obligations.

Teen drivers and adults alike should make safe driving their #1 priority.  Think of everything you learned in your Driver’s Education class, whether it was recently or many years ago.  There is no one, regardless of age, for whom cell phone use is safe or legal. Even adults who have been driving for decades cannot afford to take risks.

Your future and your life can depend on avoiding cell phone use while driving.  It can affect other people’s futures and lives, too. If you have received a ticket, call a lawyer for advice and assistance.   

 

https://dmv.ny.gov/tickets/cell-phone-use-texting